Mathematics
Ireland

The Atlas of Irish Mathematics: Belfast before 1900 (Jun 2018)

To mark the start of our second year of bi-monthly "Irish county blogs" we go a little off track and shine a light on a university city that straddles two counties (Antrim and Down).  Belfast has been associated with a great deal of mathematics and mathematical physics over the past two centuries, and this month we survey over 70 relevant people from the 19th century, 23 of them accompanied by headshots. Most of those documented here either completed their initial degrees or taught in Belfast in the period in question, a few others were merely born there.

This includes many names already covered here recently in connection with the University of Cambridge, as well as dozens of others. A great number of them graduated from Queen's College, Belfast, which was opened in 1849, having been chartered in 1845 like its sister schools in Galway and Cork. Those three colleges were conceived as the Queen's University of Ireland (QUI), which was dissolved in 1882 and replaced by Queen's University Belfast (QUB) and the new umbrella organisation the Royal University of Ireland (RUI), the latter including University College Dublin (UCD) and several other smaller colleges as well as the former Galway and Cork Queen's Colleges.

Anyone---including QUB students---could present themselves for examinations (and hence degrees) to the RUI, regardless of which (if any) college they attended. (On rare occasion people who had only studied at TCD or privately did so.) Indeed, until 1908, this was how all undergraduate QUB degrees were earned.

Belfast's Queen's College had been preceded by the Belfast Academical Institution (founded in 1810) which soon became the Royal Belfast Academical Institution (the "Inst"). Before the Queen's College was up and running, the Inst also offered additional training (and "third level" certificates) past the secondary level, but today it's purely a grammar school.

The matriculated students at Queen's College generally came from various Ulster schools of note, especially the Belfast Royal Academy (founded 1785), the Inst itself, Methodist College ("Methody", founded 1865), and in due course Victoria College (founded as The Ladies' Collegiate School in 1859) and Campbell College (founded 1894). At present we have not indicated below which specific school the people listed had attended earlier; sometimes such information is revealed in the links provided.

Some of those highlighted were born in Belfast, but trained outside Ulster. While a good many of these people ended up in academia, or teaching at prestigious schools, quite a few served in the civil service, or pursued careers in law or medicine, and others became clergymen. They are presented in chronological order by birth.

There are 25 Cambridge wranglers below for this period, 6 of them senior wranglers, of whom Campbell Allen (1879), Larmor (1880) and Orr (1888) were Irishmen who had already graduated with BA and MA degrees from Queen's Belfast.

Several of the wranglers we cover also received the prestigious Smith's Prize (awarded to research students in maths and theoretical physics): Thompson (1845), Tait (1852), Romer (1863), and Larmor (1880). We do not, at this time, track other prizes, awards, medals, scholarships, fellowships, named chairs, promotions, titles, leadership roles in professional organisations, and so on.

While MA degrees from Queen's Belfast (like those from Galway and Cork) were generally earned just as BAs where, at Cambridge MAs could be obtained 3 or more years after BAs upon simple payment of a fee; those degrees didn't indicate further study or completion of any additional examinations, research or theses.

In the year 1882, as the QUI was replaced by QUB and the RUI, a great number of MAs were awarded by Queen's Belfast, many of which seemingly falling into the "unearned" category. A good number of the recipients had graduated with BA degrees decades before, and some had in fact already died. On the other hand, some of the 1882 MAs below are known to have been by examination, and this is indicated where known.

Honorary doctorates were also awarded by Queen's in Belfast (or at that institution via the RUI) in the late 1800s. Two such DSc degrees of note were awarded in 1880 in Belfast by the RUI.  One was to physicist Arthur Hill Curtis (1827?-1886), who had just become Assistant Commissioner of National Education for the whole country. He was born in Dublin and educated at TCD (BA 1850, MA 1853, LLD 1862), and taught for 2 decades at Queen’s College, Galway, where he also served as registrar and authored the book A Mathematical Deduction of the Principal Properties of the Gyroscope (Alexander Thom, 1862).  The other such DSc (hon) went to Charles Niven (1845-1923), who was was born 14 September in Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, and was educated at Aberdeen (BA 1863) and Cambridge (senior wrangler 1867, MA 1870).  He was professor of maths at Queen's Cork, published on electricity and heat, and then taught physics for 4 decades at Aberdeen.

From 1900 on, the story broadens and deepens considerably.  It will take several future blogs to cover the ground there.

Comments and corrections are, as always, welcome.  As are more photographs of the forgotten faces from the past!

Thanks to D.L. MacLaughlan-Dumes (UCLA), Paul Greaney (NUIG) and Anne van Weerden (Utrecht) once more for genealogical assistance.

 

 

notable_photo

1. Mathematician and thermodynamics pioneer James Thomson (1786-1849) was born 13 November in Annaghdown near Ballynahinch, Down. He was educated at the University of Glasgow (MA 1812) and was professor (and eventually provost) there following two decades at the Belfast Academical Institution. He authored 4 books while teaching in Belfast, and later An Elementary Treatise on Algebra Theoretical and Practical (1844). His son William (later known as Lord Kelvin, see below) grew up in Belfast and Glasgow and gained fame as a brilliant scientist, mathematician, and engineer.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Glasgow / Ulster Bio

notable_photo

2. Mathematical physicist John Stevelly (1795-1868) was born 23 June in Cork and educated at TCD (BA 1817, MA 1827). His four and a half decade long career was spent at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution and at Queen’s Belfast.

Link

notable_photo
3. Isaiah Steen (1798-1871) was born in Balleney, near Coleraine, Londonderry. He attended the Royal College in Belfast (General Certificate in Arts 1818), and was a pastor in the years 1824-1833. Taking over from James Thomson at the Royal Belfast Academical Institute, following the latter's move to Glasgow, he taught at the Inst until 1870, also serving as head of maths. He published the very popular A Treatise on Mental Arithmetic, in Theory and Practice (Simpkin & Marshall, 1844).

notable_photo

4. John Radford Young (1799-1885) was born in April in London and was largely self-educated. He taught at Belfast College in the period 1833-1849, and authored over 20 books, a third of them while Belfast based.

Wikipedia

notable_photo

5. Physicist, mathematician and engineer William Thomson (later known as Lord Kelvin, 1824-1907) was born 24 June in Belfast, where his father James Thomson (see above) taught maths at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution. The family moved to Glasgow when he was nine, and he was educated there and at Cambridge (Peterhouse, 2nd wrangler 1845). His entire career was spent back at Glasgow, doing pioneering work on heat, electricity and thermodynamics. He is also remembered for his engineering insights which led to the first successful transatlantic cable.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Britannica

 

notable_photo

6. William Wilson (1826-1874) was born circa January in Peterborough, Northamptonshire, England, and was educated at Cambridge (St John's, senior wrangler, 1847). He then became the first professor of maths at Queen's College, Belfast, establishing an observatory there, and soon published the book A Treatise on Dynamics (Hodges & Smith, 1850). After 5 years, however, he decamped to Melbourne, where for 2 decades he worked as professor of maths and astronomy, before dying relatively young.

Wikipedia / Ulster Bio / Aus

notable_photo

7. William Lupton (1830-1876) was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1852, MA 1853), indeed he was a member of the first class to graduate from there. He then served as the registrar at Queen's College, Galway, followed by a stint as professor of jurisprudence and political economy. He died in his mid 40s.

Bio

notable_photo

8. Mathematical physicist Peter Tait (1831-1901) was born 21 April in Dalkeith, Midlothian, Scotland, and educated at Cambridge (Peterhouse, senior wrangler 1852). He replaced Wilson above as professor of maths at Queen's Belfast, but left after just 6 years, spending the rest of his career at Edinburgh. He co-wrote 22 text books.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Bio / Enc Brit / Tait Inst

notable_photo

9. Mathematician and physicist Joseph Everett (1831-1904 ) was born in Suffolk, England, and was educated at Glasgow (BA 1856, MA 1857). He taught at Queen's Belfast in the period 1867-1897, and authored 4 books while there, including expository works on dynamics, light and sound. His daughter was Alice Everett below.

Wikipedia

notable_photo

10. George Slesser (1834-1862) was born 27 April in Milton of Gaval, Buchan, Aberdeenshire, and was educated at Aberdeen (MA 1853) and at Cambridge (Queen's, senior wrangler 1858, MA 1861). He in turn took over the Queen's professorship from Tait above, but only for 2 years due to his very early death (of consumption). He had been researching moving axes. He was replaced temporarily by Sharpe below.

Aberdeen

notable_photo

11. John Purser (1835-1903) was born 24 August in Dublin and was educated at TCD (BA 1855+, MA 1859). He followed Slesser above as professor of maths at Queen's Belfast in 1863, a position he held until 1901, also serving as registrar for a spell. His students included Larmor and Orr below.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Ulster Bio

notable_photo

12. Joseph Allan Millar (1837-1876) was born 19 or 22 February in Lisburn, Antrim, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1855). His short career was spent in the military (royal engineers).

Queen's / Obit

notable_photo

13. Unionist activist and businessman Thomas Sinclair (1838-1914) was born 23 September in Belfast and was educated at Queen's there (BA 1856, MA 1859), later being awarded an honorary DLit (1882). He has been credited with introducing golf to Ulster and authoring the Ulster Covenant.

Link / Queen's / Hopefield / Covenant 1 / Covenant 2 / Links

notable_photo

14. Henry Sharpe (1838-1917) was born 16 September in Warwick, England, and was educated at Cambridge (St John's, 6st wrangler 1861, MA 1864). He temporarily replaced Slesser above when he fell ill. While he spent most of the rest of his life as a clergyman back in England, he published in applied mathematics on and off, and also corresponded with Stokes.

Link / Letters / Stokes

notable_photo

15. John S. Porter (1838??-1924) was born in Scotland, and was educated at Queen’s, Belfast (BA 1858, MA 1882), where he studied under Tate. Today, there is a maths scholarship at QUB in his name.

Scholarship

notable_photo

16. Mathematician and physicist John Leebody (1840-1927) was born January in Ballinderry (?), Antrim, and was educated at Queen's (BA 1862, MA 1863), later being awarded an honorary DSc there (1882). His long career was spent at Magee College in Londonderry, where he rose to the rank of president.

Magee / Grave / Wife

 

notable_photo
 
 

17. Randal Nixon (1840-1901) was born about August in Worcestershire, and educated at the University of London (BA 1863?) and at Cambridge (Peterhouse, 21st wrangler 1864, MA 1867). He first taught at the Brewers Company Grammar School, and at Glasgow, then for several decades at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution (where he taught Larmor), before moving to London. He authored the books Euclid Revisited and Geometry in Space (Clarendon, 1880).

Cambridge / Link

notable_photo
 
 
 

18. George McWatters (1841-1891) was born in Down and educated in maths and classics at Queen's Belfast (BA 1860, MA 1882 by exam). His career was spent in the civil service in India.

Grave

notable_photo
 

19. William McLaren Smith (1843-1873) was born 24 June in Belfast and was educated at Queen's (BA 1866). He was admitted to Cambridge (Trinity) and studied there briefly. His very short career was spent teaching in India, first at the College of Berhampore and then at Presidency College (Calcutta).

Cambridge / Grave

notable_photo
 

20. Robert Cleeland (1844-1911) was born in Belfast and educated there at Queen's (BA 1864, MA 1865), where he later served as a tutor.

1901 Census / Grave

notable_photo

21. Robert Sankey Stevelly (1845-1916, son of John above) was presumably born in Belfast and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1863) and at Cambridge (Peterhouse, BA 1868). He taught for a while at Aldenham School (Watford) before becoming an inspector of schools in England.

Bio

notable_photo

22. James Wylie (1845-1935) was born in Antrim and was educated at Queen's (BA 1867, MA 1868). He pursued law and later served as Privy Counsellor of Ireland.

Prabook / Privy

notable_photo

23. Hugh McLaren Smith (1847-?) was born 11 November and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1866, MA by exam 1882). His career appears to have been spent in the civil service in India.

notable_photo
 

24. Ross Scott (1847?-1908) was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1869, MA 1870). His career was spent in the civil service in India, where he served as judge.

Link / Death

notable_photo
 

25. John Young (1848?-1914) was born in Newry, Down, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA & Gold Medal 1868, MA 1882). For many years he taught at the Londonderry Academical Institution, then from 1888 until his death he ran the Portadown News in Armagh.

Bio / Death

notable_photo
 

26. Thomas Foster (1848?-1898) was educated at TCD (BA, 1870, MA 1873). He taught at the Belfast Royal Academy, rising to the rank of headmaster and playing a big role in saving the school, but died suddenly at 50.

BRA / BRA history / Link

notable_photo
 

27. Elliot Paxton Dewar (1849-1920) was born 6 February in Scotland, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1870, MA 1872). His career was spent as inspector of schools in Ireland.

Inspector

 

notable_photo

28. Engineer and mathematician John Perry (1850-1920) was born 14 February in Garvagh, Londonderry. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BE & gold medal 1870, MA 1882), and his academic career included short stints in Bristol, Glasgow (with William Thomson, aka Kelvin), and Imperial College (Tokyo) before setting down at Finsbury Technical College and later Imperial College (London). He successfully challenged Kelvin on the subject of thermal conductivity, and authored 5 books on mechanics and applied maths, including one on spinning tops. He received an honorary DSc from RUI in 1886, and an honorary LLD from Glasgow in 1901. His nieces included pioneering early engineering graduate Alice and mathematics graduate Agnes.

Wikipedia / Obit

notable_photo
 
 

29. John MacFarland (1851-1935) was born 19 April in Omagh, Tyrone, older brother of Robert below. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1871, MA 1872) and Cambridge (St John's, 26th wrangler 1876, MA 1879). His career started at Repton School (Derbyshire), following which he emigrated to Melbourne University, where he focussed on administration and rose to the rank of chancellor. RUI awarded him an honorary LLD (1892).

Wikipedia / Cambridge / Repton / Dic Ulster Bio / Aus Dict Bio / Geelong /

notable_photo
 

30. Charles Victor Coates (1853-1944) was born 25 August in Belfast and educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1873, MA 1874) and Cambridge (Trinity, 5th wrangler 1877. MA 1881). He taught at Birkbeck College.

Cambridge

notable_photo

31. James McNeill (1853-1907) was born 6 March in Belfast, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1875?, MA 1878?). He taught at the Royal Belfast Academical Institution (1875-1878), Methodist College (1878-1890) and Campbell College (1890-1907).

Campbell

notable_photo

32. Applied mathematician and education expert Edward Parnall Culverwell (1855-1931) was born in Belfast. He was educated at TCD (BA 1877, MA 1882), where he later became the first professor of education. He published the books Elementary Mechanics (Longmans, Green and Co., 1890) and Montessori Principles and Practice (Bell, 1913).

Nature / Bio
notable_photo

33. Samuel Russell (1856-1917) was born 10 February in Strabane, Tyrone, and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA, 1877, MA 1878). He taught maths and astronomy Imperial College in Beijing. Among his publications was an adaptation of W. H. Murray's system of teaching Mandarin to the blind.

Link

notable_photo

34. Andrew Campbell Allen (1856-1923) was born 9 February in Belfast. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1875, MA 1877), where he was taught by John Purser, and at Cambridge (Peterhouse, senior wrangler 1879, MA 1882). He was tutor and fellow at Peterhouse, and also principal of Chester Training College, before becoming a vicar for the last 3 decades of his life. Campbell Allen published numerous papers on trigonometry, geometry, optics and electicity. He was also a prolific author on ecclesiastical matters.

Wiki / Family / Cambridge / Chester / Books

notable_photo

35. Thomas Knowles (1856-1920?) was born 13 February in Ferragh, Cullybackey, Antrim. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1877, MA 1879) and Cambridge (Peterhouse, 19th wrangler 1883, MA 1886). He taught at the Royal Grammar School (Lancaster) and at Liverpool College Upper School (serving as vice-principal there). His interests included astronomy and chemistry.

Cambridge / Belfast 1 / Belfast 2

notable_photo
 

36. Theoretical physicist Joseph Larmor (1857-1942), older brother of Alexander below, was born 11 July in Magheragall, Antrim, and grew up there and in Belfast. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1874, MA 1875), where he was taught by John Purser, and at Cambridge (St John's, senior wrangler & Smith's Prize 1880, MA 1883). [JJ Thompson was 2nd wrangler.] He was professor at Queen's Galway for 5 years, then spent nearly half a century at Cambridge, in 1903 getting the chair vacated by Stokes upon his death. Most of his research concerned electricity, thermodynamics, and the electron theory of matter. He had at least 4 doctoral students and authored or edited 6 books, including the influential Aether and Matter (Cambridge, 1900) and 2 volumes of the papers of Stokes (Cambridge, 1904 & 1905). He received honorary doctorate from RUI (1882), TCD (1893) and Cambridge (1920).

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Family / Enc Brit / Ulster Bio

notable_photo
 

37. John Eccles (1857-1921) was born 9 September in Larne, Antrim, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1876, MA 1877) and at Cambridge (Peterhouse, 14th wrangler 1881, MA 1885). For over a quarter of a century he worked for the Survey of India.

Belfast / Cambridge / India

notable_photo

38. Charles Oliver (1857-1937) was born 25 October in Rathmines, Dublin, and brought up there and in Belfast, where he graduated from Queen’s (BA 1876, MA 1878). He spent 2 decades in China, first at the Chinese Imperial Customs Office, then teaching Mandarin at the Imperial College in Beijing, where he rose to the rank of president.

Bio

notable_photo

39. James Rea (1857?-1933) was born in Down and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1885). For part of his career he taught at Dublin's Church of Ireland Training College on Kildare Place.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

 

notable_photo

40. William Johnston (1858-1924) was born in Dublin and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1875, MA 1878) and at TCD (BA 1883). He taught at Aberystwyth College for almost 4 decades, and wrote An Elementary Treatise on Analytical Geometry (Clarendon, 1893).

Aberystwyth 1 / Aberystwyth 2

notable_photo

41. Physicist Alexander Larmor (1858?-1936), younger brother of Joseph above, was born (when?) in Magheragall, Antrim, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1879, MA 1881) and Cambridge (Clare, 11th wrangler 1884, part III 1885, MA 1888). He got fellowships both at Clare and at Owen's College, Manchester. Most of his career was spent teaching at the Londonderry Academy, where he served as head, and Magee College. He authored some books on Euclid's geometry.

Cambridge / Nature / 1901 Census / 1911 Census

 

notable_photo

42. Thomas Collier (1858-1928??) was born 28 July (either in Cork or in England!) and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA 1878, MA 1882). For part of his career, he taught in Belfast.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

 

notable_photo

43. William McClintock (1859-??) was born in Antrim and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1878, MA 1879). He spent part of his career as inspector of schools in Ireland.

1901 Census

 

notable_photo
 

44. Robert MacFarland (1860-1922) was born 18 October in Omagh, Tyrone, younger brother of John above. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1880) and Cambridge (Gonville and Caius, 9th wrangler 1883, MA 1890). His career was spent teaching at Repton School (Derbyshire) and at Campbell College, serving as headmaster at the latter.

Cambridge / Repton / Campbell / Link

notable_photo

45. James Tate (1860-1892) was born 20 February in Leitrim. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1881, MA 1882) and at Cambridge (St John's, 16th wrangler 1886, MA 1890). He taught at King's School (Rochester) and at Derby School, then died suddenly during the interview process for a headmaster position.

Cambridge

notable_photo

46. Robert Semple (1860-1937) was born 22 May in Belfast and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA 1880, MA 1881), the University of London (BA, 1881), and at St John’s Cambridge (21st wrangler 1884, MA 1887). His career was spent as a clergyman, mostly in Downpatrick and Limerick.

Grave

notable_photo

47. David Stewart (1861-1934?) was born 11 August in Belfast and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1881, MA 1882) and Cambridge (Gonville & Caius, 6th wrangler 1885, part II 1886, MA 1889). He was vice-principal at Chester Training College before serving as a clergyman (mostly in England) for the rest of his life. He also taught for a few years at Foyle College in Derry.

QUB / Cambridge / 1901 Census

notable_photo

48. John Campbell (1862-1924) was born 27 May in Antrim and was educated at Queen's Belfast (1883 or 1884), Oxford (Hertford, MA 1886) and RUI (MA 1887). His career was spent at Oxford, where he was an early supporter of women's education. He worked in Lie algebras and differential geometry, and wrote two influential books.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Obit / Times

notable_photo

49. Charles McVicker (1862-1933) was born 20 July in Londonderry, and was educated at TCD (BA 1886, MA 1893) and Cambridge (Christ's, 17th wrangler 1892). He taught at St Mary's College (Hammersmith) for part of his career.

Bio 1 / Bio 2

notable_photo

50. James Gregg (1862?-??) was born somewhere and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1881, MA 1882) and at TCD (BA 1891). Nothing is currently known about his career.

 

notable_photo
51. Benjamin Steede (1863-

1920) was born in June in Nenagh, Tipperary, and grew up there and in Galway and Belfast. He was educated at Queen’s Belfast (1886?) and TCD (BA 1887, MA 1890). While he then did medicine and practiced as a doctor in Newscastle and Rostrevor, he stil found time to publish maths.

Paper

notable_photo
52. Thomas McAnlis (1864-1890)

was born 6(?) January in Belfast, and was educated at Queen’s Belfast. His career was spent as a missionary in India.

Bio

notable_photo

53. John Alexander (1865-??) was born 12 Nov in Imlick, Carrigans, Donegal, near Londonderry. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1886, MA 1889) and at Cambridge (St John's, 8th wrangler 1890, MA 1895). His whole career was spent as headmaster of Tavistock Grammar School in Devon. He was a prolific writer on local history.

QUB / Cambridge / Tavistock

notable_photo

54. Astronomer Alice Everett (1865-1949) was born 15 May in Glasgow, and brought up in Belfast, where her father was professor of natural philosophy at Queen's College. She was educated there and at Girton. Sitting the Royal University of Ireland examinations earned her a BA (1887) and her Tripos performance (1889) earned her an RUI MA the same year. She worked at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich and in the USA (Pottsdam and Vassar), and much later did research in optics and the engineering of early television.

Wikipedia / Bio

notable_photo
 

55. John Wylie (1865-1935) was born in Belfast and was educated at Queen's (BA 1890). He taught physics in Belfast.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

56. William McFadden Orr (1866-1934) was born 2 May in Ballystockhart, Comber, Down, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1885, MA 1887), where he was taught by John Purser, and Cambridge (St John's, senior wrangler 1888, part II 1889, MA 1892). His career was mostly spent at the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, moving to UCD when RCSI was merged with it in 1926. His interests were broad, and he published on hypergeometric series, dynamics and fluid dynamics. QUB awarded him an honorary DSc (1919).

Wikipedia / Cambridge / Nature / Royal Soc / Dic Nat Bio / Equation

notable_photo
57. James Workman (1866-1955) was born 16 November in Mullan, Aghadowey, Londonderry and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (MA 1899). He taught at Methodist College and then in Ontario.
notable_photo

58. James McBride (1868-1949) was born 4 December in Coreen, Broughshane, near Ballymena, Antrim, and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA 1889?) and the University of London (BSc in physics 1898). His career was spent teaching in Glasgow, and upon retirement he moved to Dublin for a while. He published on and off, and was a founding member of the Euclidean Society.

MacTutor / Obit

notable_photo

59. Physicist William Morton (1868-1949) was born 17 February in Belfast and educated at Queen's there and at Cambridge (St John's, 8th wrangler 1892, MA 1898). He taught back at Belfast for 4 decades, also serving as dean. He did research in electricity, acoustics, and hydro-dynamics there, supervised at least 5 master's theses by women, and received a DSc (year?).

Wikisource / QUB / Cambridge / BBC / Papers / Obit / 1901 Census

notable_photo

60. Richard Heron (1868-1931) was born 17 September in Dunadry, Antrim. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1890, MA 1893) and at Cambridge (St John's, 20th wrangler 1893, MA 1901). He taught briefly at Campbell College and later became an inspector of schools.

QUB / Cambridge / Campbell / 1911 Census

notable_photo
 

61. Jane McCutcheon (1868-1956) was born 8 September in Limerick city. She was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA 1891) and later taught in Belfast.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo
 

62. Harold Major (1869-1933) was born 24 February in Lisburn, Antrim, and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA 1888) and Cambridge (Queen’s, BA 1891, MA 1898). He taught at Mansfield Grammar School for a decade and at Weymouth College for three more decades.

Cambridge

notable_photo

63. William Houston (1871-1953) was born 18 January, possibly in Coleraine, Londonderry. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1892, MA 1896) and at Cambridge (St John's, 5th wrangler 1896, part II 1897). His career was spent at Cambridge, followed by 4 years at UCG, then he became assistant commissioner of education for Ireland.

QUB / 1911 Census

notable_photo

64. John Leathem (1871-1923) was born 5 May in Belfast and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1891) and Cambridge (bracketed 4th wrangler, 1894, part II 1895). The University of London awarded him a DSc (1899). His relatively short career was spent at Cambridge. He wrote 4 books, including Volume and Surface Integrals Used in Physics (Cambridge, 1905), in which he introduced the now standard arrow notation for limits. His colleague G. H. Hardy enthusiastically embraced and promoted this innovation.

Nature (page 437) / Grave / Book

notable_photo

65. William Clements (1872-1949) was born 7 September in Maryborough, Laoise. He was educated at Queen's Belfast, then at Cambridge (St John's, BA 1897, MA 1908). He taught briefly at Methodist College, Belfast, before turning to a career as a clergyman in England.

QUB

notable_photo

66. George Locke (1872-1958?) was born 13 February in Belfast, and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1894) and Cambridge (St John's, BA 1897, MA 1901). His career was spent teaching at the Royal Agriculture College (Cirencester), Wallasey Grammar School, and Stand Grammar School (Whitefield, where he was headmaster).

QUB / Cambridge

notable_photo
 

67. Alfred Robb (1873-1936) was born 17 or 18 January in Belfast, and was educated first at Queen's Belfast (BA 1894) and at Cambridge (St John's, BA 1897, MA 1901). He was an expert on the Zeeman magnetic effect, and obtained his doctorate in 1904 under Woldemar Voigt at Göttingen on "Beiträge zur Theorie des Zeemaneffektes". His career was spent at Cambridge, where he authored four books on time, space and relativity.

Wikpedia / QUB / Cambridge / RSMB

notable_photo
 
 

68. Physicist James Rice (1874-1936) was born in Belfast and educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1896, DSc by exam 1900). He taught 1902-1914 at the Liverpool Institute and then until 1936 at the University of Liverpool. He was an expert on general relativity who hosted Einstein on his 1921 visit to Liverpool.

Nature / IOP (page 18) / Clarke (page 125)

notable_photo
 

69. Archibald Tombe (1875-1959) was born 27 November in Dugary, Drumdermot, Ballymena, Antrim. He was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1898) and RUI (private MA 1902).

1901 Census

notable_photo

70. Alfred Gillespie (1877-1961) was born 6 July in Newry, Down, and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA 1899). His career was spent as a clergyman.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

71. Samuel Smith (1877-1953) was born 18 March in Londonderry, and was educated at Queen’s Belfast (BA 1899). His career was spent in the civil service in India and Burma.

1924 / 1931

notable_photo
 

72. Thomas Vinycomb (1878-1843) was born in Down and was educated at Queen's Belfast (BA 1899, MA in physics 1901). His career included a spell teaching at Woolwich, and he authored 2 books on electricity.

1901 Census

 
 
  Flag Counter