Mathematics
Ireland

The Atlas of Irish Mathematics: Cork before 1900 (Dec 2019)

To celebrate the 5th anniversary of the creation of AIMM, which now accounts for over 4500 people and 900 books, and to mark the end of 2019, we highlight over 90 maths people associated with the county and university city of Cork.  A year earlier, we did the same for Galway, and the plan is to survey early Dublin maths people at the end of 2020.

Specifically we focus on those Cork-associatees whose initial university education (or equivalent) was completed by the end of the 19th century.  Future blogs will advance the story to 1999.  While many of those documented here were educated in Cork, or taught there in the period in question, some were born in the county and educated elsewhere.  As usual, in addition to mathematicians there are some physicists and engineers of interest.

Queen's College, Cork (QCC) was opened in 1849, having been chartered in 1845 like its sister schools in Belfast and Galway. Those three colleges were conceived as the Queen's University of Ireland (QUI), which was dissolved in 1882 and replaced by Queen's University Belfast (QUB) and the new umbrella organisation the Royal University of Ireland (RUI), the latter including the former Galway and Cork Queen's Colleges, and also University College Dublin (UCD) and some smaller colleges. Queen's College Cork later became University College Cork (UCC, 1908).

The 1850 Synod of Thurles had proclaimed the then new colleges as being dangerous to faith and morals for Catholics, which led to low enrollment at Cork (and the other new colleges) from that part of the population for several decades.

From 1882 on, anybody could present themselves for examinations (and hence degrees) to the RUI, regardless of which (if any) college they attended.  (On rare occasion people who had studied privately, or at one of the smaller colleges, did so.)  Until 1908, this was how all undergraduate Queen's Cork degrees were earned.

The professors of mathematics (with dates of service) at Cork before 1900 were George Boole (1849-1864), Robert Romer (1865-1867), Charles Niven (1867-1880), John Malet (1880-1887), A. H. Anglin (1887-1913). Little is currently known about many of the Galway maths graduates pre 1900, even where or when they were born, but for others some career hints have been detected.

Some of the people highlighted below were born somewhere in the county of Cork, but trained elsewhere, in particular this applies to those educated before 1850.  While a good many of the people considered ended up in academia, or teaching at prestigious schools, quite a few served in the civil service, or pursued careers in law or medicine, and still others became clergymen.  They are presented in chronological order by birth.

Generally, MA degrees from QCC (like those from Belfast or Galway) were earned by examination just as BAs were.  At Cambridge, MAs could be obtained 3 or more years after BAs upon simple payment of a fee; those degrees didn't indicate further study or completion of any additional examinations, research or theses.  In the year 1882, as the QUI was replaced by the RUI (and QUB), numerous MAs were awarded by Queen's Cork in the "unearned" category.  A good number of the recipients had graduated with BA degrees many years before, and some had in fact died.  On the other hand, some of the 1882 MAs below are known to have been by examination, and this is indicated where known.

As befits the location, we have a Murphy and Beamish below, and nobody named Guinness.

From 1900 on, the story broadens and deepens considerably.  It will take several future blogs to cover the ground there.

Comments and corrections are, as always, welcome. As are more images of people featured here.

Thanks to Olivia Bree (St Pat's, Drumcondra) once more for considerable genealogical assistance. Des MacHale (UCC) provided crucial clarification on numerous matters. Anne van Weerden (Utrecht) also made valuable contributions and suggestions. Last updated 2 April 2020.

 

Flag Counter

 

notable_photo

 0. William Brouncker (1620-1684) was reportedly born in Castlelyons, near Fermoy, Cork. He was educated at Oxford (MD 1647), and was a founder and the first president of the Royal Society, publishing some of his research in its Philosophical Transactions. He calculated logarithms using infinite series, and found the area under a hyperbola and the lengths of certain parabolae and cycloids. He also solved the so-called Pell's equation, and developed a generalized continued fraction of π.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / DNB / Worth

notable_photo

 1. Physician Charles Willoughby (1630?-1694) was possibly born in Cork, and was educated at Oxford (BA 1649, MA 1652) and Padua (MD 1663+). He was a member of the Irish College of Physicians and was essentially the first President of the Dublin Philosophical Society. He was Donegall Lecturer of Mathematics at TCD (1692-1694).

RCPI / Library

notable_photo

 2. Pierce Goold (aka Gould, 1676?-1715)) was born in Cork, and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1698, BA 1701, MA 1706). He short career was spent as a clergyman.

Bio

   3. Philip Ronayne (1683-1755) was probably born in Cork, being associated with Marino house (near present day Cobh golf club). His 400-page book A Treatise on Algebra in Two Books: The First Treating of the Arithmetical, and the Second of the Geometrical Part (1717) "containing folding models" ran to at least 3 editions.

Bio / Ancestry

 

 4. John Brien was listed (as "J.B.") as a teacher of mathematics in Corke in his 1719 book A Tutor to Arithmetic  (G. Bennett)

Link

notable_photo  5. Caleb Cartwright (1696?-1763) was born in Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1720, MA 1723, Fellow 1724, DD 1735). He was Donegall Lecturer of Maths (1735-1738), and was then appointed the second Erasmus Smith's Professor of Natural & Experimental Philosophy (1738-1743). Following that he resigned from TCD and spent the rest of his life as a clergyman.

Wikipedia

notable_photo

 6. John Fitzgerald was listed a teacher of mathematics in Cork in his 1783 book The Cork Remembrancer.

Link

 

notable_photo

 7. William Hales (1747-1831) was born 8 April in Cork city, and was educated at TCD (Scholar, BA 1769, MA 1772, DD 1784). He published a study of Newton's theory of sounds and another of Newton's theory on the motions of the planets. In addition to numerous non-mathematical books he authored Analysis Æquationum (1784), which Lagrange admired. He was professor of Hebrew (1782-1787) at TCD and spent the rest of his life as a clergyman in Cavan.

Wikipedia / Book

notable_photo

 8. Rogerson Cotter (1750?-1830) was born in Mallow, Cork, and was educated at Cambridge (Trinity, 10th wrangler & Fellow 1771, MA, 1774). He was called to the bar, both in England and Ireland, and later served as an MP in Cork.

Cambridge / Peerage / Link

notable_photo

 9. John Stack (1760-1813) was born in county Cork, and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1780, BA 1782, Fellow 1784, MA 1786, BD & DD 1803). He authored the book A Short System of Optics (1787) and in 1790 almost became the second Andrews Professor of Astronomy at TCD, losing to William Brinkley. Most of his career was devoted to parish work.

MacTutor link / Bio

notable_photo

10. Richard MacDonnell (1787-1867) was born 10 June in High Park, near Douglas, Cork. He was educated at TCD (Scholar 1803, BA 1805, Fellow 1808, LB 1810, LLD 1813, MA, BD & DD 1821, Senior Fellow 1834), and was on the staff there for half a century after a brief period practicing law. He was professor of oratory (1816-1852), laws (1840- ), and Greek (1843- ). He was also Donegall lecturer of maths (1820-1827), and served as bursar (1836-1844), catechist, and provost (1852-1867). In the last role he was seen as a revolutionary reformer, and he was also a supporter of Catholic Emancipation. His family was responsible for Sorrento Terrace in Dalkey.

Wikipedia / TCD / Obit

 

11. John Walsh (1786?-1847) was born in Shandrum, Limerick. He was a teacher and eccentric based in Cork, who drew the attention of Boole, De Morgan, Poisson and Cauchy. He once claimed to have "discovered the general solution of numerical equations of the fifth degree at 114 Evergreen Street, at the Cross of Evergreen, Cork, at nine o'clock in the forenoon of July 7th, 1844."

MacTutor

notable_photo

12. John Stevelly (1795-1868) was born 23 June in High Park, near Douglas, Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1817, MA 1827, LLB & LLD 1844). He first taught at the Royal Belfast Academical Institute (1823-1849), and took out some patents. He was the first professor of natural philosophy at Queen's Belfast (1849-1867).

Bio  / Steam Engine

notable_photo

13. Economist and legal expert (Samuel) Mountifort Longfield (1802-1884) was born in Longueville House, Desertserges, west of Bandon, Cork. He was educated at TCD (BA 1823, Fellow 1825, MA 1829, LLD 1831). He was the first professor of political economy at TCD (1832) and then served a half century term as regius professor of feudal and English law there. He practiced law in parallel to his academic career, and was active in the Dublin Statistical Society following its founding in 1847.

Wikipedia / DNB / Enc Brit / TCD

notable_photo

14. Robert Murphy (1806-1843) was born (probably in December) in Mallow, Cork. After publishing a spectacular maths pamphlet at the age of 18, despite having no early formal education, he was educated at Cambridge (Gonville and Caius, 3rd wrangler 1829). His brief career was mostly spent at Cambridge and at the University of London. He worked in algebraic equations, integral equations (with applications to electrostatics, gravity and heat), and operator calculus. He also wrote 2 books.

Wikipedia / MAA  / Letter & Bio 

 

15. Cornelius Cronin was head of the Cork Mechanics Institute (in Cook Street) in the early 1840s, having recently authored a version of Euclid which was advertised in the Cork Southern Reporter 1841. The Cork Daily Reporter of 6 Jan 1863 announces a new school he opened in Grand Parade, Cork, and provides some background.

Link / Book / School

notable_photo

16. John Mulcahy (1809-1853) was born (probably in July) in Cork city, and was educated at TCD (BA 1830, LLB 1850, LLD 1851), which was unusual for a Catholic at that time. He is believed to have tutored there before becoming the first actual professor of maths at the new Queen's College, Galway in 1849 (he'd first been appointed professor of natural philosophy but got the maths post when the original appointee Michael Roberts below quit before the college opened). He also served as dean of the science division of the faculty of arts. Sadly, he died a few years later, having just published the book Principles of Modern Geometry (Hodges and Smith, 1852, second edition 1862). His father Tim had played a role in the story of Robert Murphy above'

IMS

notable_photo

17. Francis Beamish (1812?-1898) was probably born in Killinear, bear Bandon, Cork. He was educated at TCD (BA 1834+) and had a career as a barrister.

Link

notable_photo

18. Joseph Carson (1815-1898) was born in Cork and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1933, BA 1834+, MA 1839, BD 1948, DD 1850). He was professor of Hebrew at TCD (1878- ) and also served as vice-provost (1890- ).

TCD

notable_photo

19. Robert King (1815-1900) was born in Cork city and was educated at TCD in the same class as George Salmon below (Scholar 1835, BA & Gold Medal 1838+). While a clergyman he authored "A Primer of the History of the Holy Catholic Church in Ireland" (3 volumes, 1849-1855). He was inspector of schools in Armagh (1856–1858) and the school headmaster in Ballymena, Antrim, for over 40 years. He published many books on religious topics, and some in (and on) the Irish language.

Wikipedia / DIB / Ulster Bio / Aimn

notable_photo

20. George Boole (1815-1864) was born 2 November in Lincoln, England. Despite being largely self taught, in 1849 he secured a job as the first professor of mathematics at Queen’s College, Cork. He died prematurely, and his legacy includes Boolean algebra, which laid the foundations of the information age, and 4 books. His wife Mary and daughter Alicia (see below) also made contributions to mathematics.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Enc Brit / 200th / Song

notable_photo

21. Michael Roberts (1817–1882, twin of William) was born 18 April in Cork city, and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1836, BA 1838, Fellow 1843, MA 1848, Senior Fellow 1879). He was appointed inaugural Prof of Maths at Queen's College, Galway, in 1848, but resigned before the first students arrived in 1849. He published mathematics over a several decade period, and was Erasmus Smith's Prof of Maths at TCD (1862-1879). He authored the book A Tract on the Addition of Elliptic and Hyper-Elliptic Integrals (1871).

Wikipedia / DNB / Family

notable_photo 22. William Roberts (1817–1883, twin of Michael) was born 18 April in Cork city, and was educated at TCD (BA 1838+, MA 1843). He was on the staff at TCD from 1841 on, serving as Donegall Lecturer in Maths (1867-1876).
notable_photo 23. Thomas Sanders (1816?- ) was born in Cork and was educated at TCD (BA 1837, MA 1841, LLD 1845).
notable_photo

24. George Salmon (1819-1904) was born 25 September in Dublin, and grew up in Cork city, and was educated at TCD (BA & gold medal 1839, MA 1844). He was on the staff there for over 60 years, first in maths and then in theology, also serving as provost. He was Donegall lecturer in maths 1858-1867, and wrote numerous popular and influential textbooks on higher level algebra and geometry, some of which appeared in French, German and Italian translation.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / IMS / That's Maths

notable_photo 25. George Longfield (1818-1878, half-brother of Mountiford above) was born in Cork and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1837, BA & gold medal 1839+, Fellow 1842, MA 1844, BD 1864).

26. John Casey (1820-1891) was born 12 May in Coolattin, Limerick, and went to school in nearby Mitchelltown, Cork . He became a school teacher himself, and in middle age moved to Dublin and graduated from TCD (BA 1862). He later opted to teach at the Catholic University of Ireland, rather than at TCD where he had also been offered a position. He was one of the founders of the modern geometry of triangles and circles, wrote seven books on geometry, and is also remembered for a theorem generalising Ptolomy's theorem.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Cath Enc / DNB / DIB

notable_photo

27. Richard Townsend (1821-1884) was born 3 or 30 April in Baltimore, Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1841, Fellow 1845, MA 1852), where he spent his whole career. He authored the highly regarded Chapters on the Modern Geometry of the Point, Line, and Circle Vol I (1863), and was University Professor of Natural Philosophy (1870-1884).

Wikipedia / Bio / DNB

notable_photo

28. Hewitt Poole (1821-1897) was born 13 August in Cork and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1840, BA 1841+, Fellow 1847, MA 1852, DB & DD 1880).

Grave

notable_photo

29. George Shaw (1821-1899) was born in Dublin and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1821, BA 1843+, Fellow 1848, Senior Fellow 1890). He was the first professor of natural philosophy at Queen's Cork (1849-1854), and later worked at TCD as prof of Greek and prof of Latin, senior dean and registrar. He was also the first editor of the Irish Times (1859),

Wikipedia / IT / Link

notable_photo

30. Edward Whiteford (1822?- ) was born in Kilworth, near Fermoy, and was educated at TCD (BA 1843+). He was in the army and died before 1861.

notable_photo

31. William Clerke (1823?-1862) was born in Skibbereen, Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1844+, MA 1851).

Wikitree

notable_photo

32. John Rutledge (1823-1872) was born in Bandon, Cork, and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1843, BA 1845, Fellow 1850, MA 1851, BD 1857, DD 1860). In the mid 1850s he was a junior dean at TCD.  He spent the rest his career as a clergyman, serving as Chancellor of Armagh.

TCD / Grave

 

notable_photo

33. Horace Townsend (later Payne-Townshend, 1824-1885) was born in Cork and grew up there and in Derry. He was educated at TCD (BA 1847+, MA 1877) and at Lincoln's Inn (1851). His career was spent making investments.

Bio

notable_photo

34. John England (1825?-1916) was born in Bandon, Cork. He was educated at TCD (BA 1848+, MA 1853) and was the first professor of natural philosophy at Queen's Cork (1849-1885-?).

1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

35. Richard Conner (1823-??) was born 7 July in Cork city and was educated at TCD (1845+, Fellow 1851, MA 1852, BD & DD 1886). In the early 1860s he was an examiner in maths science at TCD. Most of his career was spend as clergyman in England.

Link /

notable_photo

36. Benjamin Williamson (1827–1916) was born in Little Island, Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1848, Fellow 1852, MA 1855). He was Donegall Lecturer in Mathematics (1876-1884), and University Professor of Natural Philosophy (1884-1890). he also served as vice provost. His books included popular ones on calculus which were used for many decades. TCD awarded him DSc (1891), and Oxford DCL (1892).

Wikipedia / Nature

notable_photo

37. John Leslie (1831?–1881) was born in Timoleague, Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1852, MA 1856, Fellow 1858, DD 1862). He was Erasmus Smith's Professor of Natural & Experimental Philosophy (1870-1881).

Wikipedia

notable_photo

38. Matthias O'Keeffe (1830?-1884) was in the first graduating class of Queen's College, Cork (BA 1852, MA 1853, MD 1860). He served as librarian there before completing his medical studies and then became Professor of Materia Medica until his relatively early death.

Obit

notable_photo

39. Thomas Martin (1831-1883) was born 13 June in Cork city and was educated at TCD (BA 1852+, Dip Eng 1858?). Most of his career was spent as a railway and canal engineer in India. He also served for a spell as principal of the Calcutta Civil Engineering College "on account of his mathematical attainments".

Obit / DIA

notable_photo

40. Samuel Madden (1831-1891) was born 6 September in Mallow, Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1853, MA 1861). He spent his life as a clergyman.

Bio

notable_photo

41. Patrick F. Ford(e) (1831?- ?) is believed to have been born near Scull, Cork. He was educated at Queen's Galway (BA 1854, MA 1856), where he held a senior scholarship in maths.  Nothing is known about his career.

notable_photo

42. Edward Townsend (1831-1919) was from Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1853, MA 1856). He was professor of engineering at Queen's Galway for half a century, and also served as registrar. He played a key role in the design of the Galway to Clifton railway. RUI awarded him an honorary DSc in 1882.

Link / Who's Who

 

notable_photo

42B. William Meade (1832-1912) was born 24 February in county Cork.  He was educated at TCD (Scholar 1856, BA 1856+, MA 1860, BD & DD 1873), where he also won Bishop's Law and McCullough prizes. His career was spent as a clergyman, first in Tyrone and Armagh, and from 1893 until his death as Bishop of Cork, Cloyne and Ross.

1901 Census / 1911 Census / Wikipedia / Bio

notable_photo

43. Herbert Gillman (1832-1898) was born 18 May, probably near Coachford, Cork, where he grew up. He was educated at TCD (BA & Gold Medal 1853+) and Lincoln's Inn. After 20 years in the Ceylon civil service, he returned to the Coachford area, where he was one of the founders of the Cork Historical and Archaeological Society, and authored Index to the Marriage Licence Bonds of the Diocese of Cork and Ross, for the years 1623 to 1750.

Bio

notable_photo

44. Richard Bullen (1835-1883) was born 18 June somewhere in Cork, and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1853, BE?). He had been the first registered student there, aged 14. His career was spent as an engineer in the British Army, and he died relatively young in Barbados.

Army / Grave

notable_photo 45. John O'Brien (1833??-??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1853, MA 1854). Nothing is known about his career.
notable_photo

46. James Swanton (1833??-??) was born in Cork and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1853). Nothing is known about his career.

notable_photo 47. John Duggan (1834??-??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1854, MA 1855). Nothing is known about his career.
notable_photo
48. Edward Palmer (1835?-1878) was educated at first at Queen's Cork (BA 1855, MA 1856). He got a medical degree (1858) from the Royal College of Surgeons in Edinburgh and had a career as a surgeon.
   
notable_photo 49. William M. O'Connor (1837??-??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1857, MA 1858, BE 1882). His career was spent as an engineer.
notable_photo 50. James Goold (1837??-??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1858). Nothing is known about his career.
notable_photo 51. Michael M. Gould (1839??-1888??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1857). Career in India?
notable_photo

52. Henry Sadeir Ridings (1839-1902) was born 4 February 1839 and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA & Gold Medal 1860, DipEng, ME 1882). His career was spent as a railway engineer, and included stints in Spain, India and South America.

Obit / Grave

 

 

notable_photo

53. Robert Romer (1840-1918) was born 23 December in Kilburn, Middlesex, and was educated at Cambridge (Trinity Hall, senior wrangler and Smith's Prize 1863, MA 1866). Following George Boole's premature death at the end of 1864, Romer beat out Robert Ball to become the second professor of maths at Queen's Cork (1865-1866). However, he soon switched track, being called to the bar and going on to have a very distinguished legal career in London.

Wikipedia / Cambridge / DNB / Queen's Cork

 

54. Stephen Fitzpatrick (1841?-1922) was born somewhere in Cork. He taught maths and English at St Patrick's College, Drumcondra (1875-1917) and then became an examiner for the Intermediate Board of Education.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

55. Agnes Clerke (1842-1907) was born 10 February in Skibbereen, Cork. She was educated privately, studying mathematics, physics and astronomy at the third level in Dublin, and later in Italy. Settling in London, she published extensively, wrote numerous popular and well regarded books on the history of astronomy, and contributed to the Encyclopaedia Britannica on both astronomy and
mathematics.

Wikipedia / MacTutor

notable_photo

56. Aubrey Clerke (1843-1923, brother of Agnes above)) was born in Skibbereen, Cork, and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1862, BA & Gold Medal 1865). His career was spent as a barrister in London.

Web

notable_photo

57. James Popham (1843?-1924) was born in Cork city and at first was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1860, MA 1861) and at TCD (BA 1864). He then attended Cambridge (Downing, 21st wrangler 1869, LLM 1872 or 1876). His career was spent as a barrister in England.

1869 / Death

notable_photo

58. Reuben Harvey (1845-1881) was baptised 17 April in Cork city, and was educated at TCD (BA & Gold Medal 1866, MD 1872?) as well as at Vienna and Würzburg. His short career was spent as a teaching physician.

Obit / Prize

notable_photo 59. Charles Niven (1845-1923) was born 14 September in Peterhead, Aberdeenshire, and educated at Aberdeen (BA 1863) and Cambridge (senior wrangler 1867, MA 1870). He was the third professor of maths at Queen's Cork (1867-1880), published in electricity and heat, then taught physics for 4 decades at Aberdeen. RUI awarded him an honorary DSc (1880).

Wikipedia / MacTutor / Royal Soc / Aberdeen / zbMATH

notable_photo

60. Robert A. Jamieson (1845?-) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1865??, MA 1866?). In 1868 he was appointed the first prof of maths at Imperial College Peking.

Link

notable_photo

61. Francis Hodder (1846-1908 was born 28 July in Fountainstown, south east of Cork city, and was educated at TCD (BA 1867).

notable_photo

62. Alfred George Dann (1847-1910) was born 22 January in Fermoy, Cork, and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1865, BE 1869). His career was spent as a clergyman.

Links

notable_photo

63. James Latham (1847-1932) was born 6 December in Cork city.  He was educated at TCD (BA 1868, MA 1871?, DD 1884).  Most of his career was spent as a clergyman in Wexford.

Obit / 1901 Census / 1911 Census

 

64. James Wilson is a common name. The bishop of that name (1780-1857) was a friend of Boole's, and a man of that name contributed to the Educational Times (1868).  Nothing is known about the latter,

 

notable_photo

65. John Burke was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1866). Nothing is known about his career.

 



notable_photo

66. (Arthur) Harry Anglin (1849-1934) was born 27 March in Cork city, and was educated at Queen's College Cork (BA 1867, MA 1868) and at Cambridge (Peterhouse, BA 1874). He taught in various schools before serving as the fifth professor of maths back at Cork (1887-1913). He published in algebra, geometry and trigonometry.

Cambridge / Obit / 1901 census / 1911 census

notable_photo

67. Robert Graham (1850-1906) was born somewhere in Donegal and was educated at TCD (BA & Gold Medal 1874, MA 1877), where he had also been a Scholar. He taught there until 1888, then taught at Kingston School in Dublin and later at Midleton College in Cork. He wrote the books Algebraic Factors (1885) and Elementary Algebra (1889).

Book / Death / 1901 Census

notable_photo

68. John Malet (1847-1901) was born 25 December in Dublin and was educated at TCD (Scholar 1866, BA 1869, MA 1873). He was  the fourth professor maths at Queen's Cork (1880-1887), and spent the rest of his life as Ass Commissioner of the Intermediate Education Board.

Link / Obit / 1901 Census

notable_photo

69. William Stoops (1844?-1919) was born in Castleblayney, Monaghan, and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1874).  At first he taught at the Coleraine Academic Institute, then in 1881 he became the headmaster at the Newry Intermediate School, Down, where he stayed until 1917.  He contributed to the Educational Times.

Obit 1 / Obit 2 / Educational Times / 1901 Census / 1911 Census

 

notable_photo 70. Thomas Horan (1850??-??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1870, MA 1872).
notable_photo 71. William J. Williams (1852??-???) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1872).
notable_photo 72. John Wilson (1843??-??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1873). Career in medicine?
notable_photo

73. Annesley Somerville (1858-1942) was born 16 November in Ballincollig, Cork, and was at first educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1875, MA 1876). He then went to Trinity College Cambridge (21st wrangler 1880, MA 1889). He taught for many decades, mostly at Eton, and authored textbooks in French. The last 20 years of his life he was MP for Windsor.

Wikipedia / Cambridge

notable_photo

74. Ralph Augustus Roberts (1854-1911-?) was born 14 May at Kilmoney Abbey? Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1876, MA 1882). He taught there and authored 5 books, on conics, plane curves, and calculus.

Link

notable_photo

75. John Dalton (1859?-1936) was born in Limerick and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1878, MA 1879). His career was spent as an inspector of national schools. He was also active in archeological circles.

1901 Census / 1911 Census / Obit

notable_photo

76. Robert Sullivan (1859?-1937) was born in Knock, Ennis, Clare, and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1878, MA 1879, LLB ?). His career was spent in the RIC.

RIC / Obit

notable_photo

77. William Coates (1857-1912) was born 2 June in Midleton, Cork, and was educated at TCD (BA 1879, MA 188x) and Cambridge (Queen's, 3rd wrangler 1886, MA 1890).  He was an examiner for the Intermediate Board of Education before being lecturer and leading coach at Cambridge for over 2 decades until his relatively early death; he also served as the bursar there.

Cambridge / Grave / Obit

notable_photo

78. Thomas Teegan (1857-1921) was born 16 March in Ballivelone, Enniskean, near Bandon, Cork, and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1880). He was a schools inspector for the National Board of Education and later taught English and History at the Central Training College. His son James (1899-1967) got his PhD in physics at UCD (1937).

Obit / Book / 1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

79. Alexander O'Sullivan (1858-1924) was born in Macroom, Cork, and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1881, MD 1884). he taught at TCD.

Wikipedia / Obit / 1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo 80. Daniel McEnery ( ) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1881, MA 1882). Career?
notable_photo

81. Harley Moore (1860-1920) was born 12 September in Limerick and was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1881, MA 1882, BE 1884). His career was spent as an engineer

Grave

 

notable_photo

82. Alice Boole (later Stott, 1860–1940) was born 8 June in Cork, a daughter of George & Mary Boole. She grew up there and in London, was educated privately and never attended university. She was a pioneer in the visualisation of 4-dimensional shapes, published several papers, and coined the term polytope for higher dimensional analogues of polyhedra. She was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Groningen (1914) and worked with Donald Coxeter.

Wikipedia / MacTutor / LMS

notable_photo

83. Willliam Bergin (1864-1942) was born 9 February in Kildare town, and was educated at TCD (BA 1866, MA). He was prof of natural philosophy at QUeen's Cork (1895-1931).

Obit / Who's Who / 1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

84. Francis Moran (1860?- ?) was born in Cork and was educated at TCD (BA 1882, MA). He was an examiner for the Intermediate Education Board.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

85. George D. Evans (1861?-??) was educated at Queen's Cork (BA. 1882, MA 1883). Oxford??

notable_photo

86. William Welply (1866-1960) was born 3 April in Ballineen, Dunmanway, Cork. He was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1887) and became an inspector of schools. He was also a noted genealogist.

1901 Census / 1911 Census / Genealogist

notable_photo

87. Joseph Cussen (1867-?) was born 30 March in Cork city. He was educated at Queen's Cork (BA 1890) and is believed to have become a schools inspector.

1901 Census / 1911 Census

 

88. Edward F. Ryan (1870??- ?) was born in Cork and had a BA and received an RUI junior fellowship in maths in 1906.

1911 Census

notable_photo

89. Stephen Kelleher (1875–1917) was born 11 June in Cork city, and was educated at first at Queen's College there (BA 1895, MA 1896). He then studied at TCD (Scholar 1900, BA & Large Gold Medal 1902, MA 1905). In 1904 he became a Fellow, which was very unusual at the time for a Catholic. He was appointed assistant to the Professor of Natural Philosophy in 1910, and then Erasmus Smith's Prof of Maths (1914–1917), dying relatively young.

Wikipedia / Who Was Who

notable_photo

90. Michael Egan (1874-1961) was born 12 March in Cork city and was educated at UCD (BA 1897, MA 1899), also receiving an RUI Travelling Studentship. He taught there 1900-1947. He received an honorary DSc from NUI in 1943.

Irish Press / Obit / 1901 Census / 1911 Census

notable_photo

91. Statistician John Hooper (1878-1930) was born 26 January in Cork city and was educated at UCD (BA 1898). His career was spent in the civil sercie, first in the department of agriculture, and from 1923 on as the first director of statistics for the Irish Free State. He died before he was due to be awarded an NUI honorary doctorate. The Hooper Medal for school children is awarded each year by the CSO.

Wikipedia / Obit / CSO / CSO 2 / Medal

 

91. Joseph McCollom (1888-??) was born 2 June in Cork city, and was educated at UCD (BA 1898).  In the 1901 census he was in New Ross, Wexford, listed as Professor of Maths.

1901 Census / 1911 Census